Halton Hills and North Halton newspapers
Making scents of aromatherapy
Publication:
Independent & Free Press (Georgetown, ON), 12 Jan 2007, p. 4


Description
Full Text

Although the use of plants and oils dates can be traced back 5,000 years the actual term "aromatherapy" is really one from the 20th Century. In early civilizations the whole plant was used and it was an evolution through various cultures until we reached aromatherapy as we know it today. Aromatherapy can be seen everywhere in the marketing world from scented candles to even dish-washing detergent, but the true product is the essential oil. Not all essential oils are the same and it is important to purchase your oils from a professional who uses reputable suppliers. The quality may be affected by many variables such as soil type, climate, harvesting methods and the use of fertilizers. This means that an oil, just as a fine wine, can change from one season to another. Essential oils are volatile and therefore may react to light, temperature, air and time. This makes it necessary to store your oils in a cool, dark place. Citrus oils have a short shelf life while Patchouli is one that seems to get better with age. Individual oils have different therapeutic properties but most oils are antiseptic to some degree. Essential oils are highly concentrated and should rarely be used "neat" or undiluted. The two exceptions are Lavender and Tea Tree. Oils are organic compounds and upon application will penetrate the skin and go into the bloodstream. Absorption time varies on the average from 20-70 minutes. When purchasing an essential oil the following information should be on the label: botanical name, part of the plant used such as roots, flowers etc, country of origin, extraction process and expiry date. Price is another indicator of an oils quality. If the price is too good to be true, it probably is. Rose and Neroli are never found at cheap prices! One of the great advantages of essential oils is that they can be administered to the body in several ways, such as skin application during massage, inhalation through diffusers, baths and compresses to name a few. The amount of oil used is very small and should always be mixed with a carrier oil such as sweet almond, grapeseed, fractionated coconut. Carrier oils also have a shelf life plus therapeutic properties. This makes the selection of oils and carrier very important. One the more common methods of using essential oils is through massage. A true aromatherapy massage is gentle and rhythmical and uses essential oils selected for the condition a client is experiencing at the time. There has been success treating arthritis, stress, insomnia, fibromyalgia, muscle aches and pain and headaches. A typical session includes a confidential health intake and then a full body massage. The body is completely covered except for the section being massaged. The usual reaction after is that one experiences relief from the ailment and usually sleeps more soundly. Other modalities such as reflexology, cranial sacral or lymphatic drainage may also be used during a session depending on the qualifications of the therapist. Practitioners may be located through the web site of the CFA, local health practitioners, word of mouth or the phone book. When selecting one always remember to ask questions on training and qualifications to ensure that you are receiving the highest quality service. --Ida Mae Woodburn is a certified aromatherapist/instructor with the Canadian Federation of Aromatherapists


Media Type:
Newspaper
Item Types:
Articles
Clippings
Date of Publication:
12 Jan 2007
Subject(s):
Personal Name(s):
Woodburn, Ida Mae
Corporate Name(s):
Canadian Federation of Aromatherapists
Local identifier:
Halton.News.222982
Language of Item:
English
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Halton Hills Public Library
Email
WWW address
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Making scents of aromatherapy